An exhibition to mark Rabindranath Tagore’s birth anniversary focuses on works created in his later years

A note in the exhibition “Gurudev: The Journey of a Maestro”, informs us how, as a child, Rabindranath Tagore spent hours observing the forms of nature from his window.

A note in the exhibition “Gurudev: The Journey of a Maestro”, informs us how, as a child, Rabindranath Tagore spent hours observing the forms of nature from his window. “This love for nature and his silent conversations with it can be seen reflected in different but powerful visual forms as landscapes, doodles of animals and other composite creatures,” says the text. “He was only painting for around 20 years but has left his mark even as an artist,” says Shashi Bala, curator of the exhibition organised by Delhi’s National Gallery of Modern Art (NGMA) to commemorate Tagore’s birth anniversary earlier this month. “His worldview is evident in his works, where one also sees influences of him as a writer and playwright,” says Bala. For a man known to have given India one of its most prestigious art institutions, Santiniketan, it is only befitting that an exhibition celebrating his works has a bust of him designed by a student from the very institution. So right at the entrance of the exhibition hall is a bearded Tagore, cast in bronze, with his head tilted down — a KS Radhakrishnan work.

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Frida Kahlo, Self Portrait with Loose Hair, 1947 with the inscription "Here I painted myself, Frida Kahlo, with my reflection in the mirror. I am 37 years old and this is July, 1947. In Coyoacan, Mexico, the place where I was born". #womensart

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