Bride Wore a Paper Gown

We have all gone through the usual paper craft classes at school, but Asya and Dmitry Kozin have taken the art to incredible and amazing levels. The creative couple from Russia creates spectacular wedding dresses from the humble paper. The wonderful creations feature intricate details with fascinating headpieces. The gowns are an artistic interpretation of Kazakhstan wedding traditions, and each work takes the duo months to complete. They focus on exploring the possibilities of contemporary paper sculptures and the versatile white paper is used not only as a tool, but also as a concept which helps to express the historical process in a symbolic fashion. The images of Mongolian, African, Scythian, Venetian, Baroque, Art nouveau cultures are easily recognizable while simultaneously metaphorical.

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Frida Kahlo, Self Portrait with Loose Hair, 1947 with the inscription "Here I painted myself, Frida Kahlo, with my reflection in the mirror. I am 37 years old and this is July, 1947. In Coyoacan, Mexico, the place where I was born". #womensart

Photographer Pennie Smith, The Clash, 1979, used for the 'London Calling' album cover art and voted best rock 'n' roll image #womensart

It's International #PolarBearDay! This polar bear by François Pompon, shown here in marble, was so popular it was produced in a variety of other sizes, from tabletop to full scale, and a range of mediums, including plaster and porcelain. https://t.co/YJu4lCXVMS

Embroidery created by contemporary UK textile artist Hannah Hill aka Hanecdote #womensart

Floored by awe each time I see this desk in the Rijksmuseum, made by Abraham Roentgen, the most famous German cabinetmaker of his time. There's a video showing its secret compartments and how it can conveniently be turned into a small altar. https://t.co/U1SXJfnvMK

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